Scared of scaring them off?

Email Marketing is a fantastic way to stay in touch with your customers, offer them special deals or added value services and a great platform to create the one thing we are all after – loyal customers.

But it can be a dangerous tool in careless hands, because consumers can be very unforgiving... Send an email marketing message to your database of lawyers, housewives and secretaries about the fabulous new range of belly-button rings you have on offer, and they are not likely to ever open one of your emails again...


You’ve probably heard a lot of marketing talk about ‘segmenting your database’ and ‘targeting your campaigns’ and rightly so – this is the best and easiest way of making sure you don’t step on any toes, and get the most bang for your buck from your marketing – but what do you do if you don’t know your database enough to segment?

Earlier in this blog we talked about different ways to segment your database – lets expand now on our second point – it’s not too late if you don’t know them already.

Some tips:


In all likelihood the majority of the email addresses you have acquired over the years are nothing more than an email address, and if you’re lucky, the first and last name of the customer.

The most important thing to remember is that just because they're your customers, it doesn't mean they want to start receiving your email newsletters.

If they didn't check a box for email marketing, or if you haven't emailed them anything in years, you shouldn't start sending them emails out of the blue.

So what can you do? It's simple, but surprisingly few email marketers bother. They're so excited about sending their first campaign, they throw politeness out the door. If you have a list of customer email addresses, and you want to start sending them email marketing, but you don't have their permission yet or aren’t sure, ask them for permission.

Send a "Re-Introduction Email." It's extremely effective, and best of all, it's polite. You just put together a personal note and write it like you'd write to a friend. It’s about showing your customers you respect their right to ‘email privacy’ and that you aren’t interested in being one of the many emails they delete each day –and of course, that you can offer them something of value.

Don’t make it a sales email, make it the first part of a conversation that lets them know you want to get to know them better. If suitable, sign off from the CEO and use their name (but not too much). If you can, remind them how they ended up on your list, but give them an incentive to stay there too.

For more information about effective email marketing click here.

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